• @AdamEatsAss@lemmy.world
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    31 year ago

    Great news! I remember the first cell phone I ever had I replaced the battery on twice. It’s absurd that tech companies today just expect us to trash our phones when the battery starts going.

    • MentalEdge
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      1 year ago

      It’s like the only way they sell new ones now.

      If batteries didn’t fail, phones from 5 years ago would still be fine. Mobile OS and app demands haven’t increased that much, so the only barrier to using our devices are the wear on the battery, and the refusal to provide security updates.

      Next we need laws forcing some kind lf bare minimum of software support, though I have no idea what that would look like.

      • borari
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        01 year ago

        It’s like the only way they sell new ones now.

        If batteries didn’t fail, phones from 5 years ago would still be fine.

        I just got the battery on my iPhone XR, a 4.5 year old phone, replaced before a 3 week summer holiday. I had the option of replacing it myself, paying a third party store to replace it, or paying Apple to replace it. The part of the article that concerns me is quoted below.

        For “portable batteries” used in devices such as smartphones, tablets, and cameras, consumers must be able to “easily remove and replace them.” This will require a drastic design rethink by manufacturers, as most phone and tablet makers currently seal the battery away and require specialist tools and knowledge to access and replace them safely.

        That makes it sound like the current iPhone’s, like the XR at least and through the 14, won’t be considered “user replaceable” because they don’t have a back cover that just pops off, like they used to have on the Galaxy S12 or whatever. I’m concerned that this will result in phones either losing decent water resistance capability, or losing brand new battery capacity because manufacturers have to use a smaller battery in order to fit in a bunch of new gaskets and seals around a battery cover.

        the refusal to provide security updates.

        This is the single largest problem with phone manufacturers today. Apple devices currently get about 5-6 years of full OS updates, and up to 9-10 years of security updates. Samsung is the Android industry in this regard, and they, only just within the past year, committed to 5 years of security updates. Huawei commits to 24 months of security updates.

        I can wholeheartedly support the requirements for battery recycling and mandated percentage of recycled material in new batteries, but if the EU really wanted to address e-waste they would be prioritizing legislation to enact minimum security update timelines. This is the single biggest driver of “planned obsolescence” and e-waste in smart phones and tablets today.

        • MentalEdge
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          01 year ago

          Nah, its the biggest driver for people who care. Most people will see the “you just got your last update” notification and happily keep using the phone for several more years. It’s not safe, but the reason that actually makes people dump their old phones right now, is the battery.

          There are ways to make phone batteries replaceable, and water-resistant. One would be to allow water to enter the battery compartment, but make everything inside impervious to water, and merely protect the electrical contacts with something. We survived thicker phones before, we will again.

          And besides, the main reason people value water resistance, is because if you do drop your phone in a lake, you can’t have it affordably repaired, so people pay a premium for phones that are resistant to being damaged in the first place.

          • borari
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            1 year ago

            iPhones have had user replaceable batteries for at least 5 years now. Alternatively you can pay about $45 for a third party repair center to do the swap, or you can pay $90 to have it done at an Apple Store. That’s extremely affordable when you’re talking about a $700+ phone. Maybe it’s much more of an issue in the Android phone space, but the only manufacturer directly named in the article was Apple.

            And besides, the main reason people value water resistance, is because if you do drop your phone in a lake, you can’t have it affordably repaired, so people pay a premium for phones that are resistant to being damaged in the first place.

            I pay a premium for phones that are resistant to being damaged because of the inconvenience of dealing with a damaged phone, regardless of repair cost. Even if I paid for AppleCare, I’m fucked if I drop my phone in the toilet while on work travel in Japan. Yeah, there are Apple stores in Tokyo, but I definitely used my phone as a crutch to navigate the Tokyo metro rail system. If it happened somewhere else, like Nagasaki or Sasebo I’d be double fucked without translation or navigation. Even if I’m just on vacation in a country where I speak the language and know where things are, now I have to stop my travel plans to get a phone fixed, even if the fix is completely free. I’d rather have a device that doesn’t lead to the loss of my personal time over an issue that could have been engineered away, but wasn’t because of some well intentioned but short-sighted legislation, especially when I can already do the thing the legislation is trying to enable me to do.

    • Derrek
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      11 year ago

      On a side note, are there any plans for the Fair phone to reach other nations?

      The thought of fixing a phone with a single Philips and easy parts access gets me giddy

  • Yes! I can’t believe this wasn’t a law previously. I hope my current phone lasts until 2027 because I don’t plan on buying another device without a user replaceable battery.